“Don’t flush trash”: less waste at Vienna wastewater treatment plant

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The amount of garbage in Vienna’s wastewater treatment plant has decreased.
The waste generated at Vienna’s wastewater treatment plant has been reduced by 335 tons since the “Don’t Flush Garbage” information campaign was launched in mid-2022.

Viennese dispose of tonnes of waste via WC.
“Our initiative against garbage disposed of incorrectly in the toilet or sewer is showing initial success,” said Vienna’s Climate City Councilor Jürgen Czernohorszky (SPÖ) in a statement on Sunday. The Viennese sewage treatment plant now receives about five percent less waste, such as wet wipes, tampons or cigarette butts, than in the previous year.

Vienna launches second wave of the “Flush No Waste” campaign
The City of Vienna wants to increase residents’ awareness about proper waste disposal. “That is why we are starting a second wave of the campaign with immediate effect,” Czernohorszky said.

Less waste in wastewater means less work for employees at the wastewater treatment plant, and proper waste disposal also protects the environment and the climate. The disposal effort for soaked waste, which burns poorly, could also be reduced. Czernohorszky: “We have an extremely well-developed offer for the correct garbage disposal in Vienna. Sewers and toilets do not have to be used as trash cans. We can all contribute to climate and environmental protection here.”

Vienna wastewater treatment plant cleans thousands of litres of wastewater per second.
Since 1980, the city’s central wastewater treatment plant, located in Simmering, has been cleaning the wastewater of the Viennese; more than 6,000 litres of sewage enter the plant every second. In 20 hours, the wastewater passes through two biological treatment stages after a mechanical treatment stage. Around 20,000 kilograms of solids and more than 100,000 kilograms of dissolved pollutants are removed daily from the wastewater. Via the Danube Canal, the treated wastewater flows into the Danube “without affecting its water quality,” according to the statement.

  • source: APA/picture: spuelkeinenmuell.at
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