2023 will be the warmest year since records began

0 0
Spread the love
Read Time:1 Minute, 13 Second

The Copernicus Climate Change Service provides monthly climate data on global average temperatures on land, in the air and the oceans, partly on behalf of the EU. The latest evaluations show October 2023 was the warmest since records began.

The average surface temperature was 15.30 degrees Celsius, 0.85 degrees Celsius above the October average from 1991 to 2020. That is 0.40 degrees Celsius above the warmest October so far in 2019.

The month was also 1.7 degrees Celsius warmer than the estimated October average between 1850 and 1900, the so-called pre-industrial reference period. For the calendar year to date, the global average temperature is the highest since records began. It is over one degree Celsius above the pre-industrial average and 0.10 degrees Celsius higher than the 10-month average for 2016, the warmest calendar year since records began.

Exceptional temperature anomalies call for more climate protection
This is also noticeable in the oceans. The average sea surface temperature for October was 20.79 degrees Celsius, the highest temperature ever recorded.
Samantha Burgess, Deputy Director of the Copernicus Climate Change Service, explains: “October 2023 saw extraordinary temperature anomalies after four months of breaking global temperature records.” We can already “say with a fair degree of certainty that 2023 will be the warmest year on record”. The urgency of ambitious climate action has, therefore, “never been greater”.

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

This post has already been read 2823 times!

Related posts

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Comment