What happens in the night between 2 and 3 a.m. when you don’t sleep?

0 0
Spread the love
Read Time:1 Minute, 44 Second

The nights, often synonymous with rest and relaxation, can also hide a darker side. A new study by researchers at the University of Arizona examines a troubling phenomenon: why do certain nighttime hours seem to be prone to violent behavior?

A 15-year analysis shows that waking at night is linked to death by suicide and homicide. This study, conducted by the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson, sheds light on key factors.

The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry published a study titled “Risk of suicide and homicide peaks at night: results from the National Violent Death Reporting System, 35 states, 2003–2017.” Night waking, age, alcohol use, and relationship problems are particularly common contributing factors.

Dr. Andrew Tubbs, the lead author, explains that disturbed sleep can impair rational thinking and trigger impulsive behaviour in vulnerable individuals. Between 2 am and 3 am, the risk of suicide is five times higher, and the risk of homicide is eight times higher, taking into account the number of awake people who might commit or suffer these acts.

The authors’ hypothesis, called “the mind after midnight,” proposes that waking at night impairs the brain’s complex decision-making functions and reduces rational thinking. This hypothesis is supported by their findings. The nocturnal risk is higher in adolescents and young adults, those who are intoxicated and those who experience relationship conflict. However, this risk is not increased in cannabis users or those who are currently depressed.

Young people aged 15 to 24 have a three times higher risk of suicide at night, while an unexpected risk of suicide was observed in older people at 6 am. Young adults make up over half of homicide victims.

Dr. Tubbs points out that few studies have examined hourly patterns of violent crime. Future research could clarify what happens in the brain to make individuals vulnerable to these risks, and whether evidence-based strategies to improve sleep and reduce night waking can help prevent these tragedies.

  • source: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry/techno-science.net/picture: Bild von Anja auf Pixabay

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

This post has already been read 2588 times!

Related posts

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

Leave a Comment