The healthiest time to eat breakfast

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Some people eat breakfast as soon as they get up, others just before leaving the house, and many don’t eat. A balanced breakfast has been proven to give us a powerful energy boost for the day. It boosts metabolism, regulates blood sugar levels, improves mood, and increases concentration. In addition, it can even help to prevent hunger pangs throughout the day. Long story short: breakfast is VERY important. But the healthiest time—when to eat breakfast—is still a mystery.

This is the ideal time to have breakfast
According to former athlete, nutritionist, and naturopath Rhian Stephenson, there is no one-size-fits-all definition of the ideal time of day. However, the Brit reveals her rule of thumb on social media: “There should be at least 12 hours between dinner and breakfast,” she explains. So if you finish dinner at 8 p.m., you should wait until 8 a.m. before having breakfast.

Theory is scientifically proven
Incidentally, the nutrition expert’s statement is scientifically proven. We all have an internal circadian rhythm – which controls a 24-hour cycle. In addition, we have trillions of bacteria in our digestive tract, known as the gut microbiome, which also follows a circadian rhythm. Just as skin cells and the body go into repair mode during sleep, it’s important to “give the microbiome enough time to rest and repair,” Rhian explains. The reason for this? Our gut has an almost magical self-cleaning mechanism, “but we need to fast for it to do its job,” she adds.
So, the key takeaway is that a longer window between meals can lead to better results in terms of gut health and stimulating metabolism.

Is there also a perfect time to eat lunch and dinner?
Rhian explains that dinner should be as early as possible: “It’s better for your sleep, metabolism, and stomach if there are three hours between dinner and bedtime.”
Lunch should depend on the time of breakfast and dinner. Here, it is particularly important to reduce the eating window, emphasizes Rhian.
Constant snacking should be avoided. “This can lead to digestive problems and tiredness. The more we snack, the less likely we are to choose whole foods and eat enough protein and fiber, as most snacks are traditionally highly processed and have a lower nutrient density than real food,” Rhian warns.

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