Five myths about the apple

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We all know and love the apple. But we obviously don’t know much about it, which is indicated by several circulating misconceptions. What is the truth behind the numerous statements about this fruit?

With only 45 to 60 kilocalories per 100 grams, apple fruit is low in calories and has a high fiber content as well as valuable vitamins and other vital substances. Therefore, the saying “One apple a day keeps the doctor away!” came long ago because the crunchy, fruity fruit is healthy and does us good.

But is it also true that we should not eat the apple cores because they are poisonous? Anyone who eats one or two apples a day need not be concerned in this regard because the amygdalin contained in them, which we ingest when we crunch the apple seeds, is so low in this amount of consumption that the resulting prussic acid does not harm our health.

Also, the myth that red apples taste sweet and green specimens sour are untrue because their taste depends on the apple variety. Although we associate warm colors such as “red” with a sweet, mellow flavor and fresh colors such as “green” instead with an acidic nuance, our brain is playing a trick on us. The color of the peel, which is not dependent on sunlight, can easily deceive us about the taste. It is, therefore, more meaningful to look at the label or ask at the market stall to decide on the type of apple that suits the taste.

The “organic” label also influences many people’s purchasing decisions, as they assume that the apple is fundamentally sustainable due to this type of cultivation. Unfortunately, this is not the case! More suitable criteria for a sustainable apple purchase are its origin and harvest time. “Regional” and “seasonal” are the better attributes against this background since apples are ecologically most sustainable for us Germans when they are in season and are not transported to us from far away, releasing a lot of unnecessary greenhouse gases in the process. So, when in doubt, a conventional apple freshly ripened in the local area should be preferred to an organic apple from South America and other faraway countries, not least to support local fruit growers.

Another misconception is that a possible waxy film on the apple skin indicates artificial additives…. The sticky film is a protective layer against insects produced by almost all apples themselves. The longer an apple is stored, the more this waxy skin develops to prevent the flesh from drying out. Some apple growers outside Germany try to help this natural protective mechanism by applying beeswax or the equally harmless candelilla wax. By the way, such fruits must be labeled as “waxed.” If you don’t want to bite a waxy apple, remove the layer with water and a cloth.

So let’s continue to enjoy the delicious taste of apples and their benefits for our health: Whether as a snack between meals, chopped into small pieces in muesli and applesauce, or baked into delicious cakes!

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